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Department of Physics

About the Department of Physics


The Physics Department is a major force in research and education at NJIT.  Its tenured and tenure-track faculty, Special Lecturers, and numerous research professors, graduate students and undergraduate students form a core group of scholars who teach not only introductory physics classes for the NJIT community at large, but also teach specialized courses at the upper division and graduate level to prepare students for professional careers in Physics and Applied Physics.

The research programs within the department represent diverse fields.  Major research programs focus on

  • solar and terrestrial physics
  • imaging and photonics
  • biophysics
  • material science and condensed matter physics

The research strengths of the department are mirrored in the educational programs. The Department typically graduates 6-8 PhD students per year.  The undergraduate programs for Applied Physics majors and minors focus on the research strengths of the department.

The goal of the department is to educate the next generation of scientists, engineers and scientifically informed citizenry through research intensive education in the physical sciences and related technologies.  In these days of rapid changes in science and technology we are also faced with the fact that progress requires interdisciplinary approaches:  many advances in science and technology are not within one discipline but occur at the boundaries of many disciplines.

To maintain our leadership in the forefront of scientific research in diverse fields such as solar-terrestrial and astrophysical research, photonics, imaging, and optical science, biophysics, material science, microelectronics etc., we continue our research efforts in the direction of applications of basic principles and the development of new devices.  By its very nature the Physics Department at New Jersey Institute of Technology is an Applied Physics Program as opposed to a traditional theoretical physics program.