You are in the College of Science and Liberal ArtsCollege of Science and Liberal Arts

Department of Physics

Past Department Seminars

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Monday, April 26, 2010 Time: Noon-1 pm with 11:30 am tea timeRoom: 407 TiernanProf. Michael JaffeDept. of Biomedical Engineering, NJIT(Materials Physics, Host: Ravindra)

Improved Performance Sugar Based Materials

Abstract:

Sugars provide a rich, sustainable starting chemistry for the synthesis of new monomers, polymers and active compounds with well defined stereochemistry and chirality. Sugar based chemistries are attractive because they are generally regarded as safe (GRAS), are a renewable resource and can be made readily available at competitive pricing. Interest is focused on isosorbide which offers unique molecular geometry and chemical functionality compatible with many existing commercial and clinically relevant chemistries. Isosorbide diglycidyl ether variants are a potential replacement for Bisphenol-A in epoxies and related thermosets.  Of special interest is the impact of asymmetric reactivity, chirality and controlled stereochemistry in the design and performance of new, potentially cost-effective structures with commercial potential.

* Work done by Xianhong Feng, Michael Jaffe, Anthony J. East, Willis Hammond and Prahbjot Saini (Medical Device Concept Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, NJIT)

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Monday, April 19, 2010 Time: Noon-1 pm with 11:30 am tea timeRoom: 407 TiernanDr. Abigail HakaWeill Cornell Medical College(Optics/Biophysics, Host: Thomas)

Seeing the Color of Breast Cancer:Raman Spectroscopy for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

Abstract: Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the United States.  It is also the most common cause of death in women ages 45-55.  Optical techniques can potentially play a diagnostic role in several aspects of breast cancer evaluation and treatment.  Data will be presented on the use of Raman spectroscopy to diagnose breast cancer.  Laboratory studies on fresh-frozen tissues are used to demonstrate that the detailed information provided by Raman spectroscopy yields accurate breast disease diagnosis.  A Raman spectroscopic-based diagnostic algorithm will be presented which classifies in vitro samples into four categories according to specific pathological diagnoses: normal, fibrocystic change, fibroadenoma, and infiltrating carcinoma.  In a laboratory setting, cancerous lesions can be separated from non-cancerous tissues with a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 95%.  Further, use of a spectral model based on the morphological structures that comprise breast tissue allows increased understanding of the relationship between a Raman spectrum and tissue disease state.  Based on the excellent results of our laboratory work, two clinical studies were undertaken.  These studies translate Raman spectroscopy from a laboratory technique into a clinically useful tool.  The first study tests the diagnostic algorithm in a prospective manner on freshly excised tissue.

Preliminary results are promising.  The second study is the first demonstration of in vivo data acquisition of Raman spectra of breast tissue.  The culmination of this research is the demonstration of accurate intra-operative margin status assessment during partial mastectomy surgeries. Application of our previously developed diagnostic algorithm resulted in perfect sensitivity and specificity in this small in vivo data set.  These preliminary findings indicate that Raman spectroscopy has the potential to lessen the need for re-excision surgeries resulting from positive margins and thereby reduce the recurrence rate of breast cancer following partial mastectomy surgeries.  The data demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy is a viable clinical tool that can be used to accurately diagnosis breast cancer and breast disease.

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Monday,  April 12, 2010Time: Noon-1 pm with 11:30 am tea timeRoom: 407 Tiernan

Prof. Wenda CaoNJIT(Solar & Terrestrial Physics)

Scientific Instrumentation for the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope in Big Bear

Abstract:

The NST (New Solar Telescope), a 1.6-m clear aperture, off-axis telescope, is in its commissioning phase at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). It will be the most capable, largest aperture solar telescope in the US. The NST will be outfitted with state-of-the-art scientific instruments at the Nasmyth focus on the telescope floor and in the Coude Lab beneath the telescope. At the Nasmyth focus, several filtergraphs already in routine operation have offered high spatial resolution photometry in TiO 706 nm, Ha 656 nm, G-band 430 nm and the near infrared (NIR), with the aid of a correlation tracker and image reconstruction system. Also, a Cryogenic InfraRed Spectrograph (CIRS) is being developed to supply high signal-to-noise-ratio spectrometry and polarimetry spanning 1.0 to 5.0 micron. The Coude Lab instrumentation will include Adaptive Optics (AO), InfraRed Imaging Magnetograph (IRIM), Visible Imaging Magnetograph (VIM), and Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph (FISS). A 308 sub-aperture (349-actuator deformable mirror) AO system will enable diffraction limited observations over the NST's principal operating wavelengths from 0.4 through 1.7 micron. IRIM and VIM are Fabry-Perot based narrow-band tunable filter, which provide high resolution two-dimensional spectroscopic and polarimetric imaging in the NIR and visible respectively. FISS is a collaboration between BBSO and Seoul National University focussing on chromosphere dynamics. This talk reports the up-to-date progress on these instruments including an overview of each instrument and details of the current state of design, integration, calibration and setup/testing on the NST.

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Monday, March 8, 2010Time: Noon-1 pm with 11:30 am tea timeRoom: 407 Tiernan

Prof. Reginald C. FarrowNJIT(Biophysics)

Cell Communications at the Nanoscale

Abstract:

Biological cells act on and react to their environment by way of a complex series of electrochemical signals.  These signals determine every function of the cell from taking in food to cell division to the actual death of the cell.  Biologists have carefully studied this complex chain of signals mainly using florescent markers in combination with optical microscopy.  The spatial resolution has therefore been limited while many important effects cannot be measured.  A multidisciplinary research program is underway at NJIT to study cell signaling with sub-optical spatial resolution using an array of interconnected carbon nanotubes that can measure electrochemical signals inside of living and motile cells.  A significant breakthrough in nanoprobe electrical measurements from live neuronal cells will be presented along with the controlled deposition and functionalization of carbon nanotubes.  The potential for the next frontier in the biophysics of cell signaling will be described.

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Monday, March 1, 2010Time: Noon-1 pm with 11:30 am tea timeRoom: 407 Tiernan

Prof. Weida WuDept. of Physics, Rutgers University - New Brunswick(Condensed Matter Phyiscs, Host: Ahn)

Structural vortex in multiferroic hexagonal manganites

Abstract:Hexagonal manganites (REMnO3) show a unique improper ferroelectricity induced by structrual trimerization. Extensive research on these systems has been carried due to its potential application in memory and the intriguing multiferroicity (coexistance of ferroelectricity and antiferromagnetism). However, the true ferroelectric domain structure and its relationship with structural domains have never been revealed. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM), we observed an intriguing conductive "cloverleaf" pattern of six domains emerging from one point, all distinctly characterized by polarization orientation and structural antiphase relationships in hexgonal manganites.[1] The cloverleaf defects are structural vortices where the phase angle goes successively through all six phases.[2] In addition, we discovered that the ferroelectric domain walls and structural antiphase boundaries are mutually locked. By correlating room temperature c-AFM with low temperature electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) images of the same sample region, we demonstrate that nanoscale electric conduction between a sharp tip and the surface is intrinsically modulated by the polarization of ferroelectric domains.[3] These fascinating results reveal the rich physics of the hexagonal system with a truly semiconducting bandgap where structural trimerization, ferroelectricity, magnetism and charge conduction are intricately coupled.

[1] T. Choi, et al, nat. mater., 9, 253-258  (2010) [2] M. Mostovoy, nat. mater., 9, 188-190  (2010) [3] W. Wu, et al, submitted to PRL, (2010)

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Monday, February 8, 2010Time: Noon-1 pm with 11:30 am tea time

Room: 407 TiernanProfs. John Federici and Gordon ThomasDepartment of PhysicsNew Jersey Institute of Technology

(Device Physics)Smart Coating Systems

Abstract:The Research and Development Council of New Jersey presented the 2009 Thomas Alva Edison Patent Award to US Patent # 7,244,500, “Smart Coating Systems.”  Collaboration between personnel at Army Research and Development Engineering Center and a group at NJIT carried out the work behind this patent.  The key concept in the patent was to develop a multilayered coating structure for military vehicles included layers with corrosion protection, corrosion sensing, self-healing, and sensory capabilities. We will present an overview of this work with an emphasis on our contribution.  One aspect of our contribution was to develop fabrication methods and sensor designs for the coating structure. Sensor arrays up to 4” square on a flexible substrate were fabricated and characterized.  Our sensors were integrated with a switch layer, a display layer and mounted on a panel with rust and scratch sensors.

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Monday, January 25, 2010Time: Noon-1 pm with 11:30 am tea time*** Room: 407 Tiernan (Note Special Room)****Dr. Anna Michel, Princeton UniversityCenter for Mid-Infrared Technologies for Health and the Environment

(Biophysics, Host: Thomas)

Laser-Based Sensing for Health and the Environment

Abstract:The development of novel optical sensors using laser-based spectroscopic techniques will significantly benefit the fields of medical diagnostics and environmental monitoring. In this talk, I will present lessons learned from the development of environmental sensors.

In addition, an overview of the physical interactions between lasers and the analytes studied will be presented. New directions for biological sensing will be presented using both the lessons learned and an understanding of the physics behind these techniques. I will discuss mid-infrared (mid-IR) laser absorption spectroscopy which is emerging as a sensitive, cost effective, rugged tool for the detection of trace gases. Practically all chemical vapors can be identified using this type of spectroscopy, as each possesses a unique vibrational spectrum or "molecular fingerprint." Many of the strongest vibrational resonance frequencies are located in the mid-IR wavelength ranges (3 - ~20 μm) making these wavelengths ideal for trace gas sensing. With the advent of Quantum Cascade Lasers, came the possibility to make small, inexpensive "designer" lasers for optical sensors that have the potential for sub-parts-per-billionper-volume detection. I will also introduce Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

(LIBS) for the analysis of liquid samples. Through an understanding of the physics of laser-induced plasma formation and subsequent bubble formation, enhancements to liquids sensing and bio-sensing using LIBS will be explored. New applications using laser spectroscopy for biosensing will be discussed as well as the potential to develop medical devices for both CO2 and glucose monitoring. Recent results will be presented as well as an understanding of the interactions between the laser and tissue, challenges in biosensing, and future directions.

Biography

Dr. Michel is a Postdoctoral Research and Teaching Fellow at the NSF-Engineering Research Center for Mid-Infrared Technologies for Health and the Environment (MIRTHE) at Princeton University where she designs, builds, and deploys optical sensors. As part of MIRTHE, Michel led a field campaign in Beijing, China during the 2008 Olympic Games. She received her PhD from the MIT-Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the Joint Program on Applied Ocean Physics with a degree in Mechanical and Oceanographic Engineering. Her doctoral research focused on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

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Monday, December 7, 2009The New Solar Telescope in Big Bear

Prof. Philip R. GoodeNJIT(Solar & Terrestrial Physics)

Time: Noon-1 pm with 11:30 am tea timeRoom: 407 Tiernan (**NOTE  SPECIAL  ROOM**)

Abstract:For nearly three decades, Big Bear Solar Observatory has used one of the world’s most powerful solar telescopes to advance knowledge of our star.  The observatory is located high in a mountain lake in southern California.  This old telescope has been replaced by one with three times the resolution to enable scientists to probe the fundamental scale of the Sun’s dynamic magnetic fields, which can cause storms that destroy satellites and disrupt the power grid and telecommunications.    The new telescope is made possible by pushingthe envelope of current technologies, which will be discussed.The new telescope will be the most capable solar telescope in the world for a decade.  Early in 2009, first light observations with the NST (New Solar Telescope) in Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) were made.    First observational results will be shown and discussed.  The NST primary mirror is the most aspheric telescope mirror deployed to date.  The NST is early in its commissioning, and the plans for this phase will be presented.  The NST is the pathfinder for large nighttime and daytime telescopes to come.  The germane lessons learned in building and implementing the NST will be sketched.

The talk will discuss the adventures, fun and issues in the construction and implementation of the telescope.********************************************************************************************************************************************Monday, November 30, 2009

CELL COMMUNICATIONS AT THE NANOSCALETime: Noon-1 pm with 11:30 am tea timeROOM: 407 Tiernan

Prof. Reginald C. FarrowDept of Physics, NJIT(Materials Physics / Biophysics)

Abstract:Biological cells act on and react to their environment by way of a complex series of electrochemical signals. These signals determine every function of the cell from taking in food to cell division to the actual death of the cell. Biologists have carefully studied this complex chain of signals mainly using florescent markers in combination with optical microscopy. The spatial resolution has therefore been limited while many important effects cannot be measured. A multidisciplinary research program is underway at NJIT to study cell signaling with sub-optical spatial resolution using an array of interconnected carbon nanotubes that can measure electrochemical signals inside of living and motile cells. A significant breakthrough in nanoprobe electrical measurements from live neuronal cells will be presented along with the controlled deposition and functionalization of carbon nanotubes. The potential for the next frontier in the biophysics of cell signaling will be described.

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Thursday, November 19, 2009, 4:30 to 6:00 p.m. Faculty Dining Area, 3rd Floor, NJIT Campus Center

Topic: SELF-ASSEMBLED CARBON NANOTUBES AND NANO-DEVICES

Presenter: Reginald C. FarrowDepartment of Physics, NJIT

The Research Café, sponsored by the NJIT chapter of Sigma Xi, the international research honor society, was inaugurated with highlysuccessful sessions on September 29 and October 22. The Research Café now invites you to its third session on November 19.The Café endeavors to present cutting edge research in a manner that is accessible to both faculty, students and other members of the NJITcommunity, as well as to interested persons in nearby industry and scientific laboratories.

Prof. Farrow’s research lies at the interface between nano-technology and biotechnology, and may lead to ways of listening (and talking) toindividual cells. It may also lead to power sources that use blood sugar as fuel and are so small that they can powernano-computers that could circulate through the body in the blood and provide medical diagnostics as they pass through criticalorgans. There has been a great deal of research and development interest in using single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) as device elements for a hostof applications. The main difficulty with making practical devices has been an easy method to place nanotubes with the right properties onelectrical interconnects. This talk focuses on a novel method to fabricate individual or controlled arrays of interconnected vertically orientedSWNTs using electrophoresis and nanoscopic electrostatic lenses with applications as transistors, single/multiple element biomolecular detectors,and nano-scale biofuel cells. The latter of these has been demonstrated and will be discussed in detail with a discussion of the fascinating applicationsof this technology which may change the face of medicine.

Dr. Reginald C. Farrow is a Research Professor in Physics at NJIT which he joined in 2004. Dr. Farrow joined Bell Laboratories in 1976where he started a career of research science that spanned 25 years. During his tenure at Bell Labs he did research in areas that included fundamentalcondensed matter physics, materials science, electron microscopy, and nanofabrication. He has published over 60 papers in peer reviewed journalsand proceedings, 5 patents, and has given 13 invited talks. Dr. Farrow’s main research area at NJIT explores the interface between nanotechnology and biophysics.

View Flyer

For more information about the NJIT-Sigma Xi Research Café, including future meetings, visit

http://www.njit.edu/v2/professional_society/sigmaxi/sx-ScienceCafe.htm

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 “If this was the last lecture you were going to give to a group of students, what would you say?”

Join us for the this year’s Last Lecture, “My Ultimate Reflections”Dr. N.M. Ravindra(Department of Physics, College of Science and Liberal Arts)Monday, November 9 at 5:30 pm in Room/Lab 407 Tiernan Hall.

Fatima Elgammal and Michael LawsonPresidentsOmicron Delta Kappa ®/New Jersey Institute of Technology

See the slide show.

Ravindra

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** November 6, 2009, FRIDAY  (SPECIAL DATE)**Time: Noon-1 pm with 11:30 am tea time

**ROOM: 202 ECE **

Nonlinear Optical Tissue Imaging

Prof. Feruz GanikhanovWest Virginia University(Optics/Biophysics, Host: Thomas)

Abstract:Applications of nonlinear optical techniques that help to characterize live tissue with 250 nm spatial resolution will be presented. In particular, recent results on multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of fascia, a rich collagen type-I sheath around internal organs and muscle will be discussed. I will also present results on axon imaging of the peripheral nervous system using combined microscopy techniques and most recent results on resolving sarcomere structures within the skeletal muscle using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering microscopy. Issues related to complementary information that can be obtained using four different nonlinear optical techniques will be discussed along with currently pursued instrument designs and experimental solutions that will help to find applications of nonlinear optics in biology and medicine.

*******************************************************************************************************************************************The Edison AwardNovember 5, 2009Drs. John Federici, Lim and Gordon Thomas were awarded for their patent on Smart Coating Technology in collaboration with colleaguesat NJIT and the US Army - Picatinny Arsenal.Congratulations!

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**October 23, 2009,  FRIDAY  (SPECIAL DATE)**   CANCELLED Noon-1 pm with 11:30 am tea time**ROOM: To Be Announced **

Nonlinear Optical Tissue Imaging

Prof. Feruz GanikhanovWest Virginia University(Optics/Biophysics, Host: Thomas)

Abstract:Applications of nonlinear optical techniques that help to characterize live tissue with 250 nm spatial resolution will be presented. In particular, recent results on multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of fascia, a rich collagen type-I sheath around internal organs and muscle will be discussed. I will also present results on axon imaging of the peripheral nervous system using combined microscopy techniques and most recent results on resolving sarcomere structures within the skeletal muscle using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering microscopy. Issues related to complementary information that can be obtained using four different nonlinear optical techniques will be discussed along with currently pursued instrument designs and experimental solutions that will help to find applications of nonlinear optics in biology and medicine.

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OSA NJIT Chapter presents:Wednesday, October 21, 20092:30 pm - 3:30 pm in 407 Tiernan Hall.

Professor John  Federici

"Terahertz imaging and spectroscopy for detection of concealed weapons, explosives and drugs"

Abstract:It is well-known that terahertz radiation, which covers the electromagnetic spectrum from roughly 300GHz-5THz, shows great promise as a means to detect concealed objects. THz radiation can propagate through most non-metallic and non-aqueous materials including clothing, postal packaging, plastics, etc.

Many explosives, including improvised explosive devices, exhibit characteristic THz 'colors' in both transmission and reflection. An overview of THz imaging and spectroscopy will be presented with emphasis on detection of concealed weapons, explosives, and drugs.

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Monday, March 30, 2009from 12.30-1pm  408 FMH.   Please note the new time for this seminarProf. Mitra Shojania-FeizabadiPhysics Department, Seton Hall

Cancer Study from Modeling and Theoretical to the Experimental During this talk, I will discuss the cancer study from three different perspectives.  I will start with modeling of a tumor interacting with anti-mitotic drugs.Next, I will discuss the microtubules as a key component of cytoskeleton responsible for the cell division and its mechanism to find a chromosome as a target to proceed the mitosis.  Lastly, I will discuss the importance of investigating the rigidity of microtubules in cancerous cells.

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Monday, April 6, 2009  12 pm - 1pm, 408 FMH.

Prof. Andrew HillDepartment of Biology, NJIT

The effect of prenatal nicotine exposure on postnatal development of the respiratory rhythm |Nicotine in the form of maternal smoking and environmental tobacco smoke may represent the single most important neurotoxicant to affect fetal development.  The goal of this work is to understand how prenatal nicotine exposure affects the postnatal development of the respiratory rhythm.  Using an animal model, we will test the hypothesis that prenatal nicotine exposure leads to developmental defects of the serotonergic system of the brainstem, which may, in turn, affect the ability of the brainstem to respond appropriately with protective reflexes to changes in O2 and CO2 tension. 

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April 27, 2009
12 pm – 1pm, 408 FMH

Gleb ShtengelHoward Hughes Medical InstituteInterferometric fluorescent super-resolution microscopy of 3D cellular ultrastructure

Understanding molecular-scale architecture of cells requires determination of 3D locations of specific proteins with accuracy matching their nanometer-length scale. We introduce interferometric photoactivated localization microscopy (iPALM), the combination of photoactivated localization microscopy with single-photon, simultaneous multiphase interferometry that provides sub-20-nm 3D protein localization with optimal molecular specificity.  We demonstrate measurement of the 25-nm microtubule diameter, resolve the dorsal and ventral plasma membranes, and visualize the arrangement of integrin receptors within endoplasmic reticulum and adhesion complexes, 3D protein organization previously resolved only by electron microscopy.  iPALM thus closes the gap between electron tomography and light microscopy, enabling both molecular specification and resolution of cellular nanoarchitecture.

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Monday, March 31, 2008Title: Solar Coronal Magnetic Fields: Source of Space WeatherDr. Thomas Weigelmann, Max Planck Institute, Germany(Solar & Terrestrial Physics, Host: Wang)Room: 373 Tiernan

Time: Noon-1 pm with 11:30 am tea time

Abstract:

Instabilities in the solar corona like flares and coronal mass ejections can cause harmful effects, e.g., power cut-offs, damage to satellites and thread exposure of astronauts to energetic particles. It is therefore important to investigate these processes, in particular with aim of a better prediction of eruptive phenomena. The key for these processes is the magnetic field, which couples the solar interior with the solar atmosphere and dominates all other forces by several orders of magnitude in the corona. As high accuracy direct measurements of the coronal magnetic field are not available, we extrapolate ground based and space-born measurements of the photospheric magnetic field vector into the corona. Time series of the reconstructed 3D-magnetic field and plasma equilibria are analysed, for example regarding the amount of free energy available to trigger coronal eruptions, which are the cause of space weather.

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Monday, April 28, 2008

Electropolymeric Display and Window TechnologyDr. Elliott Schlam, New Visual Media Group, LLC Eatontown, New Jersey (Materials / Device Physics, Host: Levy)Room: 373 Tiernan

Time: 3-4 pm with 2:30 pm tea time *** NOTE SPECIAL TIME ***

Abstract:  Thin metallized polymer foils can be made to function as large scale MEMS devices. Distinct from traditional Si MEMS devices, the moving element is actually the polymer foil itself. The polymer can be fabricated into an array of small pixel-like shutters to create largeflat panel displays for low cost digital billboards or can being corporate between the panels of a thermal window to create a dynamic window shade for considerable energy savings in residential and commercial buildings.

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Sept. 29, 2008

Andrei Sirenko, Assoc. Professor, Physics, NJITApplications of synchrotron radiation for materials studies: from GaN nanostructures to nanocheckerboardsRoom: 373 Tiernan Time: Noon-1 pm with 11:30 am tea time

Abstract:

Modern nanoelectronics is progressing from the planar epitaxial growth-based technology towards monolithic integration of multifunctional structures with complementary optical and electronic properties. Nanoscale selective area growth (NSAG) is a powerful technique for such integration, which holds a promise to improve both the optical properties and structural quality of the grown materials, and GaN-based device compounds in particular. A detailed analysis of the fundamental growth mechanisms and how they affect the structural and optical properties of the GaN-based NSAG structures is important for their industrial applications.

The adequate characterization tools, such as synchrotron radiation based submicron-beam high-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD), are required to support the current trends in monolithic materials integration. Here I will present our recent characterization results obtained with a nondestructive HRXRD technique and reciprocal-space-mapping (RSM) analysis with the x-ray beamsize of 240 nm [1]. Our HRXRD experiments have been carried out at two synchrotron facilities: at A2 beamline at CHESS equipped with a one-bounce focusing capillary optics and at the APS 2ID-D microscope beamline equipped with a phase zone plate. Materials and structural properties, such as thickness, strain, composition variation, and details of precursor surface migration have been determined for various NSAG ridge structures with active regions consisted of InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-wells (MQW) [2,3].

[1] A. A. Sirenko, A. Kazimirov, A. Ougazzaden, S. O’Malley, D. H. Bilderback, Z.-H. Cai, B. Lai, R. Huang, V. Gupta, M. Chien, S.N.G. Chu,  Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 081111 (2006).

[2] A. A. Sirenko, A. Kazimirov, S. Cornaby, D. H. Bilderback, B. Neubert, P. Brückner, F. Scholz, V. Shneidman, and A. Ougazzaden,  “Microbeam high-angular resolution x-ray diffraction in InGaN/GaN selective-area-grown ridge structures”, Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 181926 (2006).

[3] P. L. Bonanno, S. M. O’Malley, A. A. Sirenko, A. Kazimirov, Z.-H. Cai, T. Wunderer, P. Brückner, and F. Scholz, “Intra-facet migration effects in InGaN/GaN MQW structures grown on triangular GaN ridges studied by submicron beam X-ray diffraction, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 123106 (2008).

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Sept. 22, 2008

Kunihiro Keika,Postdoctoral fellow,Space Research Institute,Austrian Academy of Sciences

A Remote Sensing Study on the Dynamics of Energetic Ions in the Earth's Magnetosphere

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Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2008 - 2 pm to 4 pm 406 Tiernan Hall

Body- Mind culturing for Human Excellence

Human beings have evolved after millions of years of evolution of living beings on this planet. We are thus the culmination of the experimentation of Nature over such a long period and so have wonderful physical and mental powers.  Again, human beings,  by performing research, have been able to tap into some of our latent powers. But there are still great untapped powers within us which are yet to be understood and nurtured fully.

In this lecture, powers of Bio-Magnetism, Life force, Mind and Body will be explained and a revolutionary, comprehensive and yet a very simple system of enhancing these powers will be outlined which would totally transform our lives.

A demonstration of Bio-Magnestism will be given. You can experience this fundamental energy or force in you and learn how to use it fruitfully, profitably whatever be your goal in life.

A lecture/ demonstration will be given by a Senior Professor of World Community Service Centre, India - Mr. G. Balachandran and his team who are on a tour covering New Zealand, Australia, Korea, Japan, USA and Canada.

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Monday, May 5, 2008Biophysics using Raman SpectroscopyDr. Aysegul Ergin,Boston University (Biophysics, Host: Thomas)Room: 373 Tiernan

Time: Noon-1 pm with 11:30 am tea time

Abstract:

Raman spectroscopy is a technique that employs the scattering of afrequency-shifted optical signal. Although this phenomenon was first observed 80 years ago, in the last few decades with the development of modern instrumentation, the technique has found increased use in many medical, pharmaceutical, chemical and polymer companies. In this talk, some examples of common confocal Raman applications in medical/pharmaceutical industries will be briefly discussed. In addition to that, the experiments and the results of a biophysics/biomedical engineering project from NJIT to develop a non-invasive, compact confocal Raman instrument to determine the glucose concentration in blood using the Raman spectrum from the aqueous humour of a person's eye will be summarized.

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